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Puzzles To Remember

If you have puzzles that you would like to donate, please contact us at PuzzlesToRemember@gmail.com and we will find a location near you where you can bring your puzzles. We can also provide you with a donation letter so that you can claim the value of your puzzles as a tax deduction.

To see a short video from WCVB Ch. 5 "BOSTON STRONG" about Max's efforts on behalf of Alzheimer's patients, click here.

Sunday, October 23, 2011

Springbok Puzzles Donates Springbok PuzzlesToRemember for Alzheimer's Patients to 11 Adult Day Care Centers

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By Max Wallack
Puzzles to Remember

Last week, Springbok Puzzles, at their own expense, shipped their specialized Alzheimer’s puzzles to eleven additional Adult Day Care Centers.

These puzzles continue to receive outstanding reviews from Alzheimer’s caregivers and Alzheimer’s facilities. They provide a sense of calm, well-being, and accomplishment that stays well beyond the puzzle making session.

The holiday season is approaching. There are several Springbok PuzzlesToRemember that would make wonderful gifts for someone with Alzheimer’s Disease. Below are a few examples. Click here to order any of these puzzles.







Max Wallack is a student at Boston University Academy. His great grandmother, Gertrude, suffered from Alzheimer's disease. Max is the founder of PUZZLES TO REMEMBER. PTR is a project that provides puzzles to nursing homes and veterans institutions that care for Alzheimer's and dementia patients.

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Philips Andover Employees Help PuzzlesToRemember

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By Max Wallack
Puzzles to Remember

The employees at Philips in Andover MA are collecting puzzles for PuzzlesToRemember.

Andover is the global headquarters for Philips Healthcare and U.S. headquarters for Philips Electronics North America. The Andover location employs about 2,600 people.

Philips’ employees pride themselves because

“ Most are involved in creating, engineering, marketing, and manufacturing imaging and information solutions designed to improve the health and wellbeing of people around the world.”

Thank you, Philips. I look forward to coming to your offices in January and speaking to you about PuzzlesToRemember.


Max Wallack is a student at Boston University Academy. His great grandmother, Gertrude, suffered from Alzheimer's disease. Max is the founder of PUZZLES TO REMEMBER. PTR is a project that provides puzzles to nursing homes and veterans institutions that care for Alzheimer's and dementia patients.

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Sunday, October 9, 2011

Wandering: Try these tips to prevent wandering out of the house by your loved one

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By Carole B. Larkin

1. If there is a securely locked high fence around the whole perimeter of the property, let your loved one go outside, in good weather. Go outside with them.

2. If there is no secure fence or there is other danger to allowing them to go outside at will, try these approaches:

A. Remove from site triggers that would make the loved one or person with dementia think of going out, such as coats, umbrellas, shoes, purse, etc.

B. Tell your loved one or person with dementia frequently where they are and why, in a calm tone of voice. Reassure them with words like, "XXX will return in an hour to be with you" or "Your family knows where you are".

C. Don't confront or argue with the person, walk with them and redirect to another part of the house or to an activity. Use humor if possible.

D. Purchase childproof doorknob covers, or deadbolts to put on the door above the loved one or person with dementia's eye level, or slide bolts on the top or bottom of the door. These items will never be used when the loved one or person with dementia is alone in the home, only when someone is with them.

E. If you don't want to do any of the above, place warning bells above the
outside doors, or activate the house alarm system, or get a monitor that
goes on the loved one or person with dementia (such as a toddler monitor) or
a pressure mat alarm, so at least you know when your loved one or person
with dementia has left the house.

F. Try putting a full-length mirror on the inside face of the outside door.
Sometimes people don't recognize themselves and think someone is standing
there and turn around and go back.

G. Try putting a black throw rug in front of the outside door. To some
people, it looks like a hole in the floor and that they won't attempt to
cross it.

H. You might try to hide the outside door by putting a curtain in front of
it, or maybe by making sure it is the same color as the surrounding walls,
that way it may not be seen by the loved one or person with dementia.

I. Put a big sign on the outside door saying "Stop" or "Do Not Enter" or
"Danger- Do not Open".

J. Sew ID labels in the loved one or person with dementia's clothes, or get
a special Medic alert bracelet for the loved one or person with dementia, if
they have a history of escaping the house. Also they need to have a current
picture and a piece of unwashed clothes (for tracking dogs) handy to give to
the police, in case the loved one or person with dementia does escape.

K. If the loved one or person with dementia escapes while you are in the
bathroom , grab your cell phone, and run out side, look around the whole
block the house is on. Cover the whole block, if not found, call 911 and
tell them that a person with dementia has escaped the house and is lost. Try
to convince them that this person needs to be found immediately, they need
their medicines badly.

L. If the loved one or person with dementia doesn't recognize his or her
home as where they live, they may want to leave to go "Home". They may be
thinking of a home they lived in previously, such as in their childhood.
Instead of telling them that this is their home, talk about the home they
are thinking of. Reminiscing about it sometimes lessens their urge to leave.

M. If they still want to go "home" tell them you will walk with them, and
take a walk with them or tell them that you will drive them there, and take
them out for a drive. It may help if you stop to get a treat, an ice cream
cone, or snack. They probably will have forgotten about the other home by
the time you get back, and may even recognize where they live now as home.



Carole Larkin MAG, CMC, CDP, EICS,
is a Geriatric Care Manager who specializes in helping families with Alzheimer’s and related dementias issues. She also trains caregivers in home care companies, assisted livings, memory care communities, and nursing homes in dementia specific techniques for best care of dementia sufferers. ThirdAge Services LLC, is located in Dallas, TX.

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Saturday, October 8, 2011

Nestlé UK and Ireland Donate Over 350,000 Pounds to Their Alzheimer's Society

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By Max Wallack
Puzzles to Remember


Nestlé UK and Ireland donated over 350,000 pounds to their Alzheimer's Society. Nestlé chose the Alzheimer's Society as their "Charity of the Year, 2011".

For the past 12 months, Nestlé UK and Ireland's employees have conducted many fundraisers. These have included bicycle challenges, marathons, quiz nights, football tournaments, raffles, and treasure hunts. Some even participated in a sky dive!

Paul Grimwood, CEO and Chairman of Nestlé UK and Ireland, said:

"I am proud that Nestlé employees have smashed our target. The money will help fund the Alzheimer's Society's National Dementia Hotline and valuable research into finding the cause and a cure for dementia which affects over 750,000 people in the UK."

You can read more here.

Max Wallack is a student at Boston University Academy. His great grandmother, Gertrude, suffered from Alzheimer's disease. Max is the founder of PUZZLES TO REMEMBER. PTR is a project that provides puzzles to nursing homes and veterans institutions that care for Alzheimer's and dementia patients.

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PUZZLES TO REMEMBER was founded in 2008 by Max Wallack, in memory of his great-grandmother, Gertrude Finkelstein, who died of Alzheimer's disease in 2007.
Puzzles To Remember is registered in Massachusetts as a public charity. Contributions are welcome, and are tax deductible under sec. 501(c.)3 of the Internal Revenue Code.

For more information, write to us at PuzzlesToRemember@gmail.com